Financial Accounting 3 Credit Equivalent

Gather, record, analyze, and evaluate financial accounting information in the organization.

Projects

Number Title Description Credit Equivalent
FACT 200 Financial Accounting: The Language of Business

Every day, millions of financial transactions take place in businesses across the U.S. and around the world. With so many financial transactions, how can managers know if the business is currently profitable? How can creditors know if businesses will pay back the money they owe? How can investors know if a business has growth prospects? The answer is that all of these groups, managers, creditors, and investors use accounting information to make decisions. Accounting is frequently called the “language of business” because accountants take all of those transactions that happen every day in businesses and record those transactions in a consistent and comparable manner in order to provide stakeholders like managers, creditors, and investors with information they can use to make sound business decisions. In this project, students will begin with basic accounting concepts including debits, credits, and accounts. Students will also learn the principles and the constraints of accounting. Once students have mastered these ideas, they will move on to journal entries and trial balances. This project concludes with the preparation and analysis of financial statements.

Required text: Wild, John J. Financial Accounting: Information for Decisions, 5th Edition. ISBN: 978-0073527017

  • Analyze transactions to record and summarize financial information based on accepted accounting theory.
  • Analyze the strengths and limitations of accounting information in applied scenarios.
  • Prepare, analyze, interpret, and communicate financial statement information.
  • Analyze and interpret financial information using calculated ratios in applied scenarios.
2
FACT 205 Financial Accounting: Ethics and Internal Controls

In a perfect world, there would be no need for internal accounting controls or discussions about ethics. With the state of the world today, these are very important topics that all business students need to understand. Failures of internal controls and unethical behavior are frequently stories in the business news. In this project, students will learn how these situations might have been avoided. Internal controls have two primary purposes. They should help ensure that accounting systems operate as they are designed to operate. This means that established procedures are followed and any exceptions are noted and properly authorized. Following standardized procedures results in efficient operations and accurate accounting information. The second purpose is to safeguard assets from misappropriation by theft or fraud. A strong system of internal controls denies the opportunity to steal from an organization. Students will learn how to review an organization’s system of internal controls, identify shortcomings, and recommend improvements. Students will also learn about ethics in business and in accounting specifically and then develop a framework for analyzing ethical dilemmas as they work through several scenarios.

Required text: Wild, John J. Financial Accounting: Information for Decisions, 5th Edition. ISBN: 978-0073527017

  • Evaluate ethical considerations in an organization’s financial reporting environment.
  • Apply internal control activities to reduce opportunities for fraud in the accounting process and ensure compliance with stated operational procedures.

Prerequisites:

  • FACT 200: Financial Accounting: The Language of Business

    FACT 200: Financial Accounting: The Language of Business

    Every day, millions of financial transactions take place in businesses across the U.S. and around the world. With so many financial transactions, how can managers know if the business is currently profitable? How can creditors know if businesses will pay back the money they owe? How can investors know if a business has growth prospects? The answer is that all of these groups, managers, creditors, and investors use accounting information to make decisions. Accounting is frequently called the “language of business” because accountants take all of those transactions that happen every day in businesses and record those transactions in a consistent and comparable manner in order to provide stakeholders like managers, creditors, and investors with information they can use to make sound business decisions. In this project, students will begin with basic accounting concepts including debits, credits, and accounts. Students will also learn the principles and the constraints of accounting. Once students have mastered these ideas, they will move on to journal entries and trial balances. This project concludes with the preparation and analysis of financial statements.

    Required text: Wild, John J. Financial Accounting: Information for Decisions, 5th Edition. ISBN: 978-0073527017

    • Analyze transactions to record and summarize financial information based on accepted accounting theory.
    • Analyze the strengths and limitations of accounting information in applied scenarios.
    • Prepare, analyze, interpret, and communicate financial statement information.
    • Analyze and interpret financial information using calculated ratios in applied scenarios.
1
Number
FACT 200
Title
Financial Accounting: The Language of Business
Description

Every day, millions of financial transactions take place in businesses across the U.S. and around the world. With so many financial transactions, how can managers know if the business is currently profitable? How can creditors know if businesses will pay back the money they owe? How can investors know if a business has growth prospects? The answer is that all of these groups, managers, creditors, and investors use accounting information to make decisions. Accounting is frequently called the “language of business” because accountants take all of those transactions that happen every day in businesses and record those transactions in a consistent and comparable manner in order to provide stakeholders like managers, creditors, and investors with information they can use to make sound business decisions. In this project, students will begin with basic accounting concepts including debits, credits, and accounts. Students will also learn the principles and the constraints of accounting. Once students have mastered these ideas, they will move on to journal entries and trial balances. This project concludes with the preparation and analysis of financial statements.

Required text: Wild, John J. Financial Accounting: Information for Decisions, 5th Edition. ISBN: 978-0073527017

  • Analyze transactions to record and summarize financial information based on accepted accounting theory.
  • Analyze the strengths and limitations of accounting information in applied scenarios.
  • Prepare, analyze, interpret, and communicate financial statement information.
  • Analyze and interpret financial information using calculated ratios in applied scenarios.
Credit Equivalent
2
Number
FACT 205
Title
Financial Accounting: Ethics and Internal Controls
Description

In a perfect world, there would be no need for internal accounting controls or discussions about ethics. With the state of the world today, these are very important topics that all business students need to understand. Failures of internal controls and unethical behavior are frequently stories in the business news. In this project, students will learn how these situations might have been avoided. Internal controls have two primary purposes. They should help ensure that accounting systems operate as they are designed to operate. This means that established procedures are followed and any exceptions are noted and properly authorized. Following standardized procedures results in efficient operations and accurate accounting information. The second purpose is to safeguard assets from misappropriation by theft or fraud. A strong system of internal controls denies the opportunity to steal from an organization. Students will learn how to review an organization’s system of internal controls, identify shortcomings, and recommend improvements. Students will also learn about ethics in business and in accounting specifically and then develop a framework for analyzing ethical dilemmas as they work through several scenarios.

Required text: Wild, John J. Financial Accounting: Information for Decisions, 5th Edition. ISBN: 978-0073527017

  • Evaluate ethical considerations in an organization’s financial reporting environment.
  • Apply internal control activities to reduce opportunities for fraud in the accounting process and ensure compliance with stated operational procedures.

Prerequisites:

  • FACT 200: Financial Accounting: The Language of Business

    FACT 200: Financial Accounting: The Language of Business

    Every day, millions of financial transactions take place in businesses across the U.S. and around the world. With so many financial transactions, how can managers know if the business is currently profitable? How can creditors know if businesses will pay back the money they owe? How can investors know if a business has growth prospects? The answer is that all of these groups, managers, creditors, and investors use accounting information to make decisions. Accounting is frequently called the “language of business” because accountants take all of those transactions that happen every day in businesses and record those transactions in a consistent and comparable manner in order to provide stakeholders like managers, creditors, and investors with information they can use to make sound business decisions. In this project, students will begin with basic accounting concepts including debits, credits, and accounts. Students will also learn the principles and the constraints of accounting. Once students have mastered these ideas, they will move on to journal entries and trial balances. This project concludes with the preparation and analysis of financial statements.

    Required text: Wild, John J. Financial Accounting: Information for Decisions, 5th Edition. ISBN: 978-0073527017

    • Analyze transactions to record and summarize financial information based on accepted accounting theory.
    • Analyze the strengths and limitations of accounting information in applied scenarios.
    • Prepare, analyze, interpret, and communicate financial statement information.
    • Analyze and interpret financial information using calculated ratios in applied scenarios.
Credit Equivalent
1